bird ringing chew valley bird ringing course chew valley ringing station

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2014 Ringing Course

News from the Ringing Station

March summary
A rather quiet month with just 69 ringed and 112 retraps. Highlights include 1 female Bearded Tit on 1st, a new female and a control female Cetti's Warbler...

Controls & Recoveries

Recent returns from the BTO include Canada Geese observed in Eastville Parl, Bristol as well as Cettis Warbler and Goldcrest.

Chew Valley Ringing Station

is located in North Somerset just north of the Mendip hills on the southwest shore of Chew Valley Lake and on the A368 road midway between Bath and Weston-super-Mare, between the villages of Bishop Sutton and West Harptree.
Ringing started at Chew Valley Lake in 1963 and the first report was produced by the Mendip Ringing Group covering the years 1962-63. Our ringing area is mainly reed bed with some scrub. Between April and September we normally catch good numbers of Reed Warblers and Sedge Warblers and a varying number of other species such as Blackcap, Chiffchaff and Willow Warbler plus the normal residents which now include Cetti's Warbler. We get a good passage of migrants and there is plenty of chance to see stages of moult. We also attempt to catch hirundines at roost.
If you wish to enquire about membership or have any other query please email us at cvrsringing@fsmail.net in the first instance for details.

Chew Valley Ringing Station's Ringing Course 3 - 5 August 2012

Most of the course members had arrived by late morning on the Friday and, in keeping with tradition, we adjourned to the Blue Bowl Pub in West Harptree for lunch. This gives a very pleasant and informal opportunity for people to get to know each other.
2012 ringing course
2014 Ringing Course - Thursday afternoon 7th to Sunday afternoon 10th August 2014
The course aims to provide a 'reed-bed experience' for ringers who normally work in a different habitat. It is also an opportunity for ringers to obtain an appraisal and/ or sponsorship for an upgrade to a 'C' or 'A' permit or an assessment for a training endorsement.
We aim to have a mixed group of six participants on the course...
The course itself began at 3.00 pm with the official introductions, the giving out of the usual notices concerning Health and Safety (of birds and people), a brief explanation about how the course operates and a net furling demonstration. In the afternoon we operated nets in the area nearest to the ringing station, plus running the Heligoland trap. After supper a successful attempt was made to catch swallows at roost using a tape lure. The setting of single panel nets at a Pied Wagtail pre-roost was less successful (two birds).
On the Saturday morning ringing began at 6.00 am and the opportunity was used to complete CES visit 9 on the eastern shore of the lake (known as area A). The quiet after lunch period' was used for a practical session calculating primary moult scores and recording wing formulae using dried bird wings. Ringing from 4.00 - 6.00 pm, was followed by Lucy Wright's talk about the BTO's purpose built database known as The Integrated Population Monitoring Recorder (IPMR). The feedback forms suggest that both talks were thought to be very helpful and at just the right level for our 6 course participants. After supper another catch was made of swallows coming in to roost. An attempt at the Pied wagtail pre-roost was abandoned due to breezy conditions at this more open site.
Ringing on the Sunday was from 7.00 - 11.00 am with one group going to Bob Medland's garden. Feedback was provided on a 'one to one' basis before lunch. Votes of thanks and the farewells followed with special mention to Fiona and Bob Medland for the catering which was once again of a high standard with self-service breakfasts, hot lunches and buffet type suppers. Also to Anne Preston and Mike Rowan for issuing rings and transcribing the data from the individual forms used for each bird. Thanks were also given to Mike Bailey, Simon Isgar, Robin Prytherch and Mike Rowan for their efforts in getting the course ready.
This year we repeated the regime of rotating 3 teams (2 trainers and 2 students per team). This worked very well, enabling 2 teams to be ringing with 1 team out on a net round. Despite the abnormally high water level at the lake and the poor breeding season we still exceeded last years overall total, both in terms of the variety and the number of birds handled. The course was offered as a 'reed-bed experience' and this we were certainly able to provide with thigh waders and wellingtons being the order of the day!.
Course totals
Species
New
Retrap
Total
Sparrowhawk
1
0
1
Barn owl
4
0
4
Water rail
0
1
1
Kingfisher
1
0
1
GSW
1
0
1
Sand martin
6
0
6
Swallow
105
0
105
Pied/white wagtail
2
0
2
Wren
12
2
14
Dunnock
3
0
3
Robin
2
1
3
Blackbird
1
0
1
Cettis warbler
0
2
2
Sedge warbler
10
0
10
Reed warbler
32
15
47
Lesser whitethroat
1
0
1
Garden warbler
1
0
1
Blackcap
27
3
30
Chiffchaff
13
1
14
Willow warbler
9
2
11
Long-tailed tit
1
7
8
Coal tit
0
1
1
Blue tit
11
26
37
Great tit
7
23
30
Nuthatch
1
6
7
Treecreeper
1
0
1
Magpie
0
1
1
Carrion crow
1
0
1
House sparrow
1
0
1
Chaffinch
0
1
1
Greenfinch
9
1
10
Bullfinch
2
0
2
Reed bunting
1
2
3
Totals
266
95
361
juvenile water rail
Juvenile water rail
pullus barn owl
Pullus barn owl